How Vinexpo Will Help Buyers and Producers Find their Perfect Match

Take advantage of a match making service that promises to arrange meetings with like-minded producers in your key target markets around the world.

You quickly appreciate quite how big the world of wine is when you step in to one of Vinexpo’s main exhibition halls and try to make your way to your first appointment. No matter how much you try and plan your diary, timings soon go to pot as you rush from stand to stand. For all the thousands of exhibitors from seemingly every country in the world capable of growing a grape you tend to stick to the companies you know, the producers and brands you already stock rather than venture too far off piste. Which is not really what these exhibitions are designed to do. Yes, you are here to build on previous relationships, but the mark of how successful a particular event normally lies in how much new business or potential additional sales you have been able to deliver.

It is a dilemma that has been very much at the forefront of Vinexpo chief executive, Guillaume Deglise’s mind as he has prepared his team for this year’s Vinexpo Bordeaux show in June. It is why this year’s show has a number of initiatives in place specifically designed to make a buyer’s visit to Bordeaux as productive as possible.

WE CAN CREATE A WISH LIST FOR BOTH SIDES FROM WHICH THEY CAN THEN CHOOSE FROM AND SET UP FINAL MEETINGS

The highlight of which is the return of its “One to Wine” meetings which allow both buyers and exhibitors to arrange meetings before the event with the most appropriate and relevant potential business partners. Particularly useful if you are looking to find distribution in new countries around the world and in markets where you currently have limited knowledge and few contacts. Both buyers and exhibitors can set out exactly the kind of business they are looking for, and in the latter’s case can even identify individual buyers they would like to have a meeting with. The buyer, though, has the final say in who they want to meet. “We can then create a wish list for both sides from which they can then choose from and set up final meetings,” explains Deglise.

The idea was first introduced for the 2015 show for a limited number of exhibitors, but is now open to all buyers and producers present. “We believe that attending a fair like Vinexpo it is not enough just to meet existing customers. This way we can help visitors potentially make some extra business through these face to face meetings,” explains Deglise. He believes it could be particularly useful for smaller producers that are not able to take out large stands at the show, but are particularly keen to connect with new buyers. It also means they will have buyers coming direct to their stand where they can show them their wines, and really explain what they are all about. Deglise urges buyers looking to attend Vinexpo to make the most of what is free service. “It is a really good way of making the most of the show. For producers it is also a good way to get the attention of buyers,” he adds. It is possible to book as many meetings as possible, but Deglise suggests no more than between four and six a day, as each are scheduled for 40 minutes and it still takes time to get from stand to stand and there are other content opportunities of which one can take advantage. He says it also a further illustration of the steps being taken to make Vinexpo a show at which to do business. “Our exhibitors are coming to Bordeaux to do business, to show their latest vintages, and new labels. It is very important for them to meet the right customers and build those relationships at the show,” he stresses. The fact the show is now being held over four rather than five days will also bring a more focused approach and allow buyers to maximise the most of what is, on average, a stay of two or three days.